A new residence hall was completed. First called “the fifth dormitory” and later known as “North,” the building was designed by the firm of Pilcher & Tachau.   Lewis F. Pilcher, professor of art from 1900 until 1911, also taught architecture classes. He and his partner, William G. Tachau, designed the Frances A. Wood house (1904) and the Goodfellowship House (1908).

The new building’s eccentricities—a nine-story tower section (with a 30,000 gallon water tank under its roof and an elevator) behind a four-story, low-rise section and eclectic ornamentation including animal figures and grotesque masks—instantly set it apart from the other quadrangle halls’ simpler designs, causing some of the architect’s faculty colleagues to refer to it as “Pilcher’s crime.”

Two short poems by Alma deVries ‘08 in The Vassar Miscellany suggest that some students were also bemused:

                        A Natural Query                                                         

Said a Freshman of wit quite vivacious:

“Will you pardon a question audacious

Behind your North Hall

Can you tell me at all

What that tall building is?—Oh, good gracious!”

            A Pleasure Trip

A maiden whose name we must hide,

On the ninth floor of North once was spied.

When asked: “Have you friends here a few,

Or did you come for the view?”

Said, “No, I just came for the ride.”

At the time of the college's 50th anniversary celebration in 1915, the building was renamed Jewett House in honor of the college's first president, Milo P. Jewett.

The announcement that a Maid’s Clubhouse would be built rewarded the efforts of many undergraduates and alumnae who raised the needed $10,000 and convinced the trustees both that some 200 maids, kitchen workers and other employees on campus were integral to the college and that ideas on which students and alumnae were allied should shape college policy.

To date, the effort had raised $8,478.41, and the rest was expected before the end of the calendar year. Professor Lewis Pilcher had drawn plans for a building containing a social hall, library, reading and sitting rooms, infirmary, bathrooms, gymnasium, locker room, kitchen and laundry.  A junior, Ruth Weeks ’08, was chairman of the building committee.     The New York Times

Snow early in the morning foretold difficult conditions for Vassar’s 13th annual Field Day, but the warmly-dressed crowd enjoyed the activities.  In the fence vault, Mildred Vilas ’07 exceeded by a quarter inch, at 4 feet 10 ¾ inches, the standing record of Dora Ellen Merrill ’02, and Inez Milholland ’09 put the eight-pound shot 31 feet 8 7/8 inches, eclipsing the college record of 29 feet 11 ½ inches set in 1902 by Elsa Hillyer White ‘02.

The sophomore class won the day with 43 points, followed by the seniors with 23, the freshmen with 20 and the juniors with 13.     The New York Times

Classical scholar Gilbert Murray, Fellow of New College, the University of Oxford, lectured on "Greece and Progress." He also lectured at the college in 1912 on "The Chorus." 

In what was becoming a tradition, the Fourth Hall production by the Philalethean Society was by Shakespeare and was performed at night on Sunset Hill.  “The sixteenth century setting” of Twelfth Night, The New York Times reported, “was adhered to as closely as possible.  There was no scenery, and placards announced the changes of scene.”

Inez Milholland ’09 portrayed Hermione “with skill and success,” and her sister Vida Milholland ’10 “was excellent as Leontes.”  Gertrude Taylor ’07 was Florizel, and the role of Perdita was played by Helen Hart ’07.

In what was becoming a tradition, the Fourth Hall production by the Philalethean Society was by Shakespeare and was performed at night on Sunset Hill.  “The sixteenth century setting” of Twelfth Night, The New York Times reported, “was adhered to as closely as possible.  There was no scenery, and placards announced the changes of scene.”

Inez Milholland ’09 portrayed Hermione “with skill and success,” and her sister Vida Milholland ’10 “was excellent as Leontes.”  Gertrude Taylor ’07 was Florizel, and the role of Perdita was played by Helen Hart ’07.

The Nativity, a 14th century English play, was presented as the year's Second Hall Play. The prologue was spoken by Inez Milholland, '09.